Roger Casement, the forgotten hero

The Story of Roger Casement, Part I

One man recanted what he wrote about Casement years later

Roger Casement is best known for his ‘Black Diaries’ which in my opinion have overshadowed the history of his  previous life in the British government as a humanitarian.   A man respected and loved by family and friends, he was not abandoned at his trial as the media and history books would have us believe.

In fact one man recanted what he wrote about Casement years later. Unfortunately, it came too late and Casement was executed. The real Casement story takes place years before the Easter Rising. He deserves more notoriety showing his contributions to his country and to society.Roger Casement

Continue reading

Political Facts about Easter Rising

Political Facts About the Easter Rising

Part I

Irish Men and Irish Women / Political Statements

1. The  Irish Proclamation of the independence, (the first official political document of the Republic) addresses Irish women as well as men.

, ‘ IRISHMEN AND IRISHWOMEN: in the name of God and of the dead generations from which she receives her old tradition of nationhood, Ireland, through us, summons her children to her flag and strikes for her freedom.

The document was read for the first time on April 24th, 1916 by Patrick Pearse.

Women continued to play a role in politics as well as rebellion, notably Constance Markievicz, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, and Kathleen Lynn who was a doctor.

Continue reading

Blog to Book/ Author Interview

Blog to Book

Author Interview w/ Shannon Haire

I am pleased to introduce the readers of Celticthoughts.com to author, Shannon Haire who has just released her new book, Petticoat, Patriots, and Partition. Shannon also writes a blog called Choosing the Green,

smilefistInterview w/ Shannon Haire

Continue reading

10 Fun Quotes about the Easter Rising

10 Fun Quotes from The Easter Rebellion

Part 2

 Inside the GPO by Joe Good is both a personal and fun read. It actually reads like a novel so if you want something historical that is both accurate and enjoyable continue reading for some Excerpts from the book………….

Book Inside the GPO Continue reading

Easter Rising Rebels would not give their names

Why the rebels of the Easter Rising would not give their names

Frongoch Concentration Camp in north Wales was not without its sacrifices for the rebels of the Easter Rising in 1916. While it is true the men had considerably more freedom at Frongoch in the old distillery compared to Kilmainham Gaol, Knutsford, or Wandsworth Prisons in England where they suffered solitary confinement,  one of the biggest personal price they paid was inflicted on themselves by themselves.

Continue reading

Why did the Easter rising fail?

Why did the Easter Rising of 1916 fail?

Or did it?

Success or failure in anything at all depends on 3 factors:

Timing,

Point of view,

Long term affects.

Easter Rising CommenorationLet’s look at the facts.

Continue reading

War on women in Ireland

War on women in Ireland

 After the Easter Rising,  the Irish Republican Brotherhood,( soon to become the IRA) targeted RIC officials with violence and murder. On the suggestion of Winston Churchill, the Black and Tans were formed in 1918 to assist the RIC to get rid of the IRA, or so they thought. They roamed free looking for vengeance. They committed murder, lead a reign of terror and violence throughout Ireland. The easiest targets were women, especially in the more rural parts of Ireland. To remain secret, they  attacked after curfew dragging men and women out of their beds in the middle of the night..

Black and Tans 2Who were the Black and Tans ?

Continue reading

Rebels as German Spies

Rebels or German Spies in 20th Century Ireland

Of all the Petticoat Rebels I have written about I think Sidney Gifford is one of my favorites. Perhaps it was because she never let anyone tell her she couldn’t do something. Like so many other female rebels in 20th century Ireland she accomplished extraordinary goals in a male dominated world.

Irish Freedom paper 2Sidney Gifford was a writer but not just any writer. While it was acceptable for females to write about subjects such as housekeeping and cooking Miss Gifford took another path entirely with pen and paper. She wrote political and considered radical essays about Irish freedom and British tyranny. She did this in not one but 2 countries. Ireland and the  America and took the pen name, John Gifford to make sure her articles were read.

 

Continue reading

Petticoat Rebels in Ireland?

womens trade unionPETTICOAT REBELS IN IRELAND

Some of the most unlikely rebels were women who grew up in Protestant Unionist households, in other words part of the Anglo Irish elite

.They went to private schools, socialized with those of their own class, lived in large Georgian houses in the same neighborhoods as their peers, supposedly sharing the same values and ideals.

The lines were strictly drawn and it was considered scandalous for women to speak up against establishment, write editorials, or do almost anything outside of homemaking. In fact, after the Easter Rising, Nellie Gifford was thrown out of her mother’s  house. So how did these women become rebels in Ireland?

GovernessSeveral reasons.

Continue reading

How British Trained Irish Rebels @ Frongoch

HOW THE BRITISH TRAINED IRISH REBELS AT FRONGOCH PRISON

 “The University of Revolution”

After the Easter Rising in 1916, England was faced with what to do with the several thousand men they’d arrested.The answer was Frongoch Internment Camp in Wales.

Frongoch-Internment-Camp_thumbFrongoch Internment Camp, a converted whiskey distillery did not squash the desire for Irish independence among the Irish rebels. 

The dream of a free Ireland continued to thrive in the hearts and souls of  of the men, despite being ripped from their homeland and families and the hardships of prison life. In fact, Frongoch was so beneficial to the War of Independence that it was nicknamed” the University of Revolution.”

Continue reading