Gay Hero or Traitor to His Country?

 The Story of Roger Casement Part II

Roger Casement may  have been gay but is that important to his accomplishments? He was hung by the British for being a traitor. Some thought it was his homosexuality that tipped the scales of justice. Casement did admit being gay at his trial which probably did not help his case.  Today we probably would not care.

gay

Did you know there was a time in British history that sodomy was punishable by hanging?

That would be a whole new post wouldn’t it?

There  is the fact of whether he was a traitor or not?  But to which country?

gayLets look at the facts

Because Ireland was still part of the British Empire, Roger Casement’s activities promoting an insurrection were categorized as sedition, rebellion, and treason. But what does Ireland think? Other rebels during the Easter Rising were probably gay too. Are they traitors as well?

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New Book

New Book Petticoat Rebels of 1916

Extraordinary Women in Ireland’s Struggle for Freedom

By Brighid O’Sullivan

Petticoat Rebels of 1916 ebook smallExcerpt from Chapter 7:

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Political Facts about Easter Rising

Political Facts About the Easter Rising

Part I

Irish Men and Irish Women / Political Statements

1. The  Irish Proclamation of the independence, (the first official political document of the Republic) addresses Irish women as well as men.

, ‘ IRISHMEN AND IRISHWOMEN: in the name of God and of the dead generations from which she receives her old tradition of nationhood, Ireland, through us, summons her children to her flag and strikes for her freedom.

The document was read for the first time on April 24th, 1916 by Patrick Pearse.

Women continued to play a role in politics as well as rebellion, notably Constance Markievicz, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, and Kathleen Lynn who was a doctor.

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Guns to fuel a Fishing Boat?

Guns aboard the boat that started it all, the Asgard!

In June of 1914, 900 guns, specifically Mauser riffles and 29,000 rounds of ammunition were purchased from Germany and shipped to Ireland. The guns were supposed  to be used to protect Home Rule but in 1916 they would be used for an all-out rebellion against England. Several women were at the heart of this mission: Alice Stopford Green, Molly Childers, (wife of Erskine Childers who also was involved) and Mary Spring Rice.

rebellion

Mary Spring Rice as a child

Mary Spring Rice grew up in a wealthy Anglo-Irish household whose compassion and free-thinking atmosphere encouraged independent thinking and a love for Irish culture. The family spoke Irish fluently. When she was selling Irish lace in London she met Erskine and Molly Childers, Alice Stopford Green and eventually Roger Casement who were part of an Anglo Irish Committee. Motivated by the Ulster Volunteers ability to smuggle guns into Larne and march all over Belfast, the group was determined to find a way to arm the Irish Volunteers as well. But how?

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Blog to Book/ Author Interview

Blog to Book

Author Interview w/ Shannon Haire

I am pleased to introduce the readers of Celticthoughts.com to author, Shannon Haire who has just released her new book, Petticoat, Patriots, and Partition. Shannon also writes a blog called Choosing the Green,

smilefistInterview w/ Shannon Haire

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ISIS In Ireland

How do we stay safe in America?

Statue of Liberty

The news is full of stories about ISIS, Immigration questions, and whether or not America should allow Syrian refugees into the country but should we turn our back on people from other nations who are in distress and what have we done in the past? What security measures are we taking now concerning immigration? 

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10 Funny Lines from the Easter Rebellion

10 Funny Lines and Events from the Easter Rebellion

Part I

There is  nothing funny about war, executions, a city destroyed, arrests, or risking one’s life but human beings have always found laughter in the most stressful of situations. Perhaps it helps them deal with a stressful situation, make them feel they are in control of something that is uncontrollable. The Easter Rebellion was no different. Add to this the fact that Irishmen are usually looking for a good laugh and you have funny lines or events that ..yes… happened during the Easter Rebellion.

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Easter Rising Rebels would not give their names

Why the rebels of the Easter Rising would not give their names

Frongoch Concentration Camp in north Wales was not without its sacrifices for the rebels of the Easter Rising in 1916. While it is true the men had considerably more freedom at Frongoch in the old distillery compared to Kilmainham Gaol, Knutsford, or Wandsworth Prisons in England where they suffered solitary confinement,  one of the biggest personal price they paid was inflicted on themselves by themselves.

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Why did the Easter rising fail?

Why did the Easter Rising of 1916 fail?

Or did it?

Success or failure in anything at all depends on 3 factors:

Timing,

Point of view,

Long term affects.

Easter Rising CommenorationLet’s look at the facts.

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Rebels as German Spies

Rebels or German Spies in 20th Century Ireland

Of all the Petticoat Rebels I have written about I think Sidney Gifford is one of my favorites. Perhaps it was because she never let anyone tell her she couldn’t do something. Like so many other female rebels in 20th century Ireland she accomplished extraordinary goals in a male dominated world.

Irish Freedom paper 2Sidney Gifford was a writer but not just any writer. While it was acceptable for females to write about subjects such as housekeeping and cooking Miss Gifford took another path entirely with pen and paper. She wrote political and considered radical essays about Irish freedom and British tyranny. She did this in not one but 2 countries. Ireland and the  America and took the pen name, John Gifford to make sure her articles were read.

 

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