Women’s Suffrage and Edna Purtell

Women’s Suffrage

Women on Different Continents fighting for a common cause.

Both Eva Gore Booth, Edna Purtell, and others fought for women’s rights, especially the right to vote but their battles would take different tactics to be fought on different shores.

Eva Gore Booth 1

 Eva Gore Booth, an Anglo-Irish woman from County Sligo Ireland, had always been sensitive to the plight of others, as was her more famous sister, Constance Gore Booth or the Rebel Countess as she became known during Ireland’s rebellious past. Both women grew up educated, well cared for, and worldly.  While Constance would live most of her adult life in Ireland, Eva  moved to Manchester, England to live with her lifelong companion, Esther Roper. Both women worked toward women’s suffrage, a journey they spent their lifetime traveling through themselves. They wrote letters, created posters and banners, and gave speeches. Had anyone listened though? Constance gave speeches, wrote manifestos, and eventual put on a uniform. She thought that if Irish freedom were obtained Women’s rights would follow.

Eva, however, did not believe in violence and never took up that particular battle. she felt the power of the pen was more beneficial. Not so for many of her comrades.

women's suffrage

Women’s Suffrage Protestor escorted by British Police

The fight for women’s suffrage was not a new war nor an unusual battle at this time in history yet the way Eva and Esther fought was different from many who spoke out in England and even in America. Eva and Esther were pacifists while the rest of the world moved toward more controversial and often risky means of protest.

The media labeled them, Suffragettes.

These women believed the only way to win women the vote was to force the general public, specifically men, to stand up and take notice of their demands. The only way to do that ..  was to shock them.

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Confessions of an Irish Spy

CONFESSIONS OF AN IRISH SPY

The Real Story of Joseph Mary Plunkett

Joe Plunkett 1

Joseph Mary Plunkett, well known as one of the signatories of the proclamation and his involvement in Ireland’s fight for independence, suffered from tuberculosis all of his life, but that didn’t stop British soldiers from executing him. Historians have found his life fascinating, especially when they learned he married his sweetheart, Grace Gifford in Kilmainham jail a short time before his execution by firing squad.  It is his sister Geraldine, who knew her brother better than anyone however.

Who was Joseph Mary Plunkett?

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Gay Hero or Traitor to His Country?

 The Story of Roger Casement Part II

Roger Casement may  have been gay but is that important to his accomplishments? He was hung by the British for being a traitor. Some thought it was his homosexuality that tipped the scales of justice. Casement did admit being gay at his trial which probably did not help his case.  Today we probably would not care.

gay

Did you know there was a time in British history that sodomy was punishable by hanging?

That would be a whole new post wouldn’t it?

There  is the fact of whether he was a traitor or not?  But to which country?

gayLets look at the facts

Because Ireland was still part of the British Empire, Roger Casement’s activities promoting an insurrection were categorized as sedition, rebellion, and treason. But what does Ireland think? Other rebels during the Easter Rising were probably gay too. Are they traitors as well?

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New Book

New Book Petticoat Rebels of 1916

Extraordinary Women in Ireland’s Struggle for Freedom

By Brighid O’Sullivan

Petticoat Rebels of 1916 ebook smallExcerpt from Chapter 7:

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Radio Broadcast and the Easter Rising

Radio and 10 Things You didn’t know about the Easter Rising

Part 2

radioA Wedding Postponed

#6.  Thomas Dillon and Geraldine Plunkett were supposed to be married in a double wedding with Grace Gifford and Joseph Plunkett on Easter Sunday.

Joseph Plunkett was a leader and planner of  the Rising. The Sinn Fein Rebellion, as it was known by the British would not have happened without him. He was a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood and helped plan the Rising by studying military tactics although he’d never before been a soldier. He also was involved in getting word out to the rest of the world on a radio. As one of the signatories of the Irish Proclamation, he was executed as well.

Joseph postponed his marriage to Grace Gifford but with all the confusion the day before the Rising he said that if he was arrested he still wanted to get married in Kilmainham Jail, which he did. Just hours after the couple took their vows, Joseph Plunkett was shot by firing squad. He was already dying of tuberculosis.

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Political Facts about Easter Rising

Political Facts About the Easter Rising

Part I

Irish Men and Irish Women / Political Statements

1. The  Irish Proclamation of the independence, (the first official political document of the Republic) addresses Irish women as well as men.

, ‘ IRISHMEN AND IRISHWOMEN: in the name of God and of the dead generations from which she receives her old tradition of nationhood, Ireland, through us, summons her children to her flag and strikes for her freedom.

The document was read for the first time on April 24th, 1916 by Patrick Pearse.

Women continued to play a role in politics as well as rebellion, notably Constance Markievicz, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, and Kathleen Lynn who was a doctor.

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Guns to fuel a Fishing Boat?

Guns aboard the boat that started it all, the Asgard!

In June of 1914, 900 guns, specifically Mauser riffles and 29,000 rounds of ammunition were purchased from Germany and shipped to Ireland. The guns were supposed  to be used to protect Home Rule but in 1916 they would be used for an all-out rebellion against England. Several women were at the heart of this mission: Alice Stopford Green, Molly Childers, (wife of Erskine Childers who also was involved) and Mary Spring Rice.

rebellion

Mary Spring Rice as a child

Mary Spring Rice grew up in a wealthy Anglo-Irish household whose compassion and free-thinking atmosphere encouraged independent thinking and a love for Irish culture. The family spoke Irish fluently. When she was selling Irish lace in London she met Erskine and Molly Childers, Alice Stopford Green and eventually Roger Casement who were part of an Anglo Irish Committee. Motivated by the Ulster Volunteers ability to smuggle guns into Larne and march all over Belfast, the group was determined to find a way to arm the Irish Volunteers as well. But how?

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10 Fun Quotes about the Easter Rising

10 Fun Quotes from The Easter Rebellion

Part 2

 Inside the GPO by Joe Good is both a personal and fun read. It actually reads like a novel so if you want something historical that is both accurate and enjoyable continue reading for some Excerpts from the book………….

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10 Funny Lines from the Easter Rebellion

10 Funny Lines and Events from the Easter Rebellion

Part I

There is  nothing funny about war, executions, a city destroyed, arrests, or risking one’s life but human beings have always found laughter in the most stressful of situations. Perhaps it helps them deal with a stressful situation, make them feel they are in control of something that is uncontrollable. The Easter Rebellion was no different. Add to this the fact that Irishmen are usually looking for a good laugh and you have funny lines or events that ..yes… happened during the Easter Rebellion.

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How One Woman’s Life Made a Difference

 LIFE AND TIMES OF CONSTANCE MARKIEVICZ

the life of Constance MarkieviczReferred to as Madam by many of her friends, Constance Markievicz was well known throughout Dublin during the period leading up to the Easter Rising.

Her life has been documented in books and periodicals as a woman that was militant, dangerously outspoken, and rebellious; a women who is described as craving the limelight and the only leader not executed after the Rising but is that all there was to her?

Life of Constance MarkieviczShe was born Constance Georgine Gore-Booth in 1868.

Until almost 30 years of age, she lived with her parents in a manor house called Lissadell and had all that any lady of wealth and class could hope for except what she wanted. A life!

In her diary she wrote:‘I feel the want. Women are made to adore and sacrifice themselves, and I as a woman, I demand as a right that Nature should provide me with something to live for, something to die for. Why should I alone never experience the best and at the same time the worst of Life’s Gifts?’ 

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